Meatless Szechwan Stir-Fry

I love Asian inspired food, but it can be quite difficult to find any that is completely vegetarian – at least where I live. So I make it myself. The other night we had this attractive and tasty meal. The recipe can also be found in my new book, Homestyle Favorites Made Meatless, which will be available next month!

Rice Noodles and Bok Choy

Rice Noodles and Bok Choy

Cook 8 ounces of rice noodles according to package directions. Drain, rinse with cold water to prevent sticking, and set aside.

Meanwhile, chop a small head of bok choy (about 4 cups) and one bell pepper. Drain a can of baby corn.

Chopped Vegetables and Baked Tofu

Chopped Vegetables and Baked Tofu

Heat 2 Tbsp of peanut oil in a large skillet or wok. Stir-fry one cup of baby corn and the bell pepper for 3-5 minutes. Add the bok choy and 4 servings of meat substitute, cut into strips. Here I used the Barbeque Baked Tofu from my last entry. It worked perfectly since Szechwan is an Asian BBQ!

Steamed Bok Choy

Steamed Bok Choy

Cover and cook 5-10 minutes or until the bok choy is tender (add small amounts of water if necessary to prevent burning. This steams the bok choy.

Vegetables and Noodles

Vegetables and Noodles

Add the drained noodles to the vegetable mixture in the wok. In a small bowl or jar, combine 1 Tbsp tamari sauce, 1/2 tsp ground ginger, 1/4 tsp ground red pepper, 2 Tbsp hoisin sauce, 2 tsp cornstarch, 1/4 cup rice wine vinegar, 1/2 cup water. Add the sauce to the wok. Cook and stir until slightly thick; 5-10 minutes.

Szechwan Stir-Fry

Szechwan Stir-Fry

As you can see this is a beautiful meal, and everything tastes good if it looks good!

  • A traditional version would include beef, but since we only do meatless in my house I used the tofu this time. I have also made this recipe using veggie burgers cut into strips.
  • This is a great dish to get lots of veggies. Since I love bok choy I use the whole head, probably about 5 cups total. Feel free to add more corn or bell pepper too.
  • Hoisin sauce is Asian BBQ sauce. You can find it in the Asian foods section at the grocery store. If meatless is important to you, be sure to check the ingredient list. Some brands include anchovies in the sauce.
  • Tamari is a true, fermented soy sauce. I purchase mine at the health food store. Be sure to buy the low-sodium kind. Most soy sauces found at the grocery store are not fermented and include caramel coloring. If you are not crazy over soy sauce, you will probably like tamari. The real thing is much smoother and not as harsh as its more common cousin.

Makes 4 servings.

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About the Author

Renee Pottle, an author and heart-healthy educator, loves to explore and write about the Mediterranean Diet. She blogs at SeedToPantry.com and HestiasKitchen.com.

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